February 25, 2018

Words about music (470): Miles Davis

It's always been a gift with me, hearing music the way I do. I don't know where it comes from, it's just there and I don't question it.

Miles Davis

Phish: Colorado 1988 tapes surface

Tapes of four Phish shows from the legendary Colorado 1998 run have surfaced. These are the most complete recordings to make it into circulation. From Phish.net:

You’re probably already familiar with LivePhish’s Colorado ‘88 release, which includes a significant number of songs performed by Phish on their first trip out to Colorado in the summer of 1988, nearly thirty years ago. But you haven’t heard those shows in full, because none of them ever circulated in full. Thanks to Niel Ringstad (who attended several of the Colorado ‘88 shows), 7/29/88, 7/30/88, 8/4/88 and 8/5/88 will now circulate almost in full for the first time. They were taped by Niel’s friend Mike Lynch.

February 24, 2018

A Cunning Man: To Heal a Broken Body

A Cunning Man, a Scottish black progressive metal act, is no longer a solo outlet for Ged Cartwright. On the new EP To Heal a Broken Body he takes care of the lead vocals, most of the instrumentation and programming, but he is now joined by guitarist Theo Le Derf, who also contributed to the songwriting. Gemma McCabe is on board once again to supplement Cartwright's booming baritone with her bewitching vocal delivery. As a team they are evolving rapidly - note the alto and soprano part courtesy of Meghan Bradford - with melody now a more dominant force, in comparison with the debut EP Practical Applications Of Theurgy.

February 23, 2018

Alberteen: The Son's Room

The Son's Room, a new song by English rhythm & noir band Alberteen popped up briefly on YouTube in January, but as of today it';s officially available through all the usual streaming services. It's their first track without any guitars, going, mainly for analog synths:

This is our first single in two years and it’s been liberating to put down the guitars and embrace analogue synths, flutes, clarinets and samples. We recorded it with Angus Wallace in a valley at Far Heath Studios, home to so much psychedelia, avant garde pop and experimental noise. We feel it rubbed off on us in some small way.This is our first single in two years and it’s been liberating to put down the guitars and embrace analogue synths, flutes, clarinets and samples. We recorded it with Angus Wallace in a valley at Far Heath Studios, home to so much psychedelia, avant garde pop and experimental noise. We feel it rubbed off on us in some small way”

The Foreign Films: The Record Collector

Canadian multi-instrumentalist Bill Majoros has scored an A+ for perseverance as he was putting together his magnum opus, the 3LP concept album The Record Collector. He worked industriously on what might well would become the ultimate indie pop project the early 21st Century. Originally intended as a double album by his project The Foreign Films, and preceded by the pop suite Fall Of The Summer Heart in 2013 (a piece that later would turn out to be the closing piece), the double album grew into a triple. Every now and then he would release a digital side as a single dish of the full course meal. And now it's here, housed in a nice slipcase for the LP's, plus a booklet with a short story that helps explaining the story line.

Majoros grouped his songs into three separate themes, telling a different tale on each album, allowing the listeners to follow the ups and downs of the characters. The Record Collector is part autobiography and part make belief and dreams. Real adventures and everyday life events are closely examined, dissected and put back together again as he saw fit. The narrative point view tends to shift, with first-person observations giving way to character voices. It might take awhile to understand that the female voices could be belonging to the same person - the evasive and mysterious Emily, who turns up to various occasions, sometimes not even by name, but it slowly becomes clear that she is the axis around which the album rotates. Is she his muse? Changes are that Majoros is familiar with Dante's Beatrice or Orpheus's Eurydice. Well, maybe not that highbrow, but the "boy meets girl and is afraid to loose her" never gets old.